Posts Tagged ‘modprobe.conf’

Linux bonding: How to maximize your throughput by combining nics.

I’m currently working on building my own iSCSI SAN w/ SCST & a modified Linux kernel. Things are going pretty well but I needed to also bond out the 5 Gb nics so my VMHosts can maximize their connections. In Linux, you bond out an interface by creating a new network interface and telling the physical nics to register w/ that virtual network interface. There’s also 7 different types of bonding modes but the most common one is mode 6 or balance-ALB (active load balancing.)

If you’re using CentOS or RHEL like I am you cd to /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ and vi ifcfg-bond0.

Once you’ve got vi open, you dump the following in (this is an example only. Please change your IPADDR, NETMASK and NETWORK parameters as needed.)

DEVICE=bond0
BOOTPROTO=none
ONBOOT=yes
NETWORK=10.0.0.0
NETMASK=255.255.0.0
IPADDR=10.0.0.100
USERCTL=no

From there, you then modify your individual eth# interface config files so they point to the bonded device. As an example, here’s my /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 interface file.

DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=none
ONBOOT=yes
MASTER=bond0
SLAVE=yes
USERCTL=no

And oh ya, don’t forget to modify your modprobe.conf file to specify the loading of the bond kernel module and what options it will needed @ run-time.

alias bond0 bonding 
options bond0 mode=6 miimon=100

Couple of useful links. There’s tons of good info on bonding w/ Linux. Keep in mind, some distros don’t want you to modify the individual interface config files so use their administrator control panel first if possible.

http://www.how2centos.com/how-to-set-up-network-bonding-with-centos-5x/
http://www.howtoforge.com/network_card_bonding_centos

Installing nVidia driver under CentOS & Red Hat 6.0

I’m a real big fan of nVidia’s Linux drivers for their GPUs and have installed them numerous times with CentOS 5. I just recently installed them under Red hat 6 (RHEL 6) and happened to notice a warning by the nVidia driver that Nouveau was already installed and needed to be removed first. Further investigation reveals that Fedora & the latest version of RHEL 6 are including Nouveau at the initial ramdisk so not only do you need to create your own modprobe.conf blacklist file but you also need to add a line on the end of your grub.conf file to tell the ramdisk not to load Nouveau at boot up.

First, creating a modprobe blacklist file to prevent the kernel from loading the Nouveau kernel module. You could easily add blacklist nouveau to any ole modprobe.conf file but you never know when your linux distribution may overwrite your modified file w/ the next update. You’re better off to just create your own modprobe blacklist file and dropping it inside /etc/modprobe.d/ folder. I went ahead and followed some directions I stumbled upon on the interwebs and created a file called /etc/modprobe.d/disable-nouveau.conf.

I then added the following to that file…

blacklist nouveau options nouveau modeset=0

Once that was done, I then needed to modify my /etc/grub.conffile so the initial ramdisk would stop loading Nouveau too. To do this I added rdblacklist=nouveauto my kernel vmlinuz line like such…

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kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.32-71.14.1.el6.x86_64 ro root=UUID=209502fb-f4f0-4755-a275-de807916fb76 rd_NO_LUKS rd_NO_LVM rd_NO_MD rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 KEYBOARDTYPE=pc KEYTABLE=us crashkernel=128M rhgb rdblacklist=nouveau
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Oh ya, I always remove the “quiet” at the end of the line too. Something about watching all of the modules load…

Here’s a couple links as usual:

http://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/260.19.36/README/commonproblems.html
http://www.if-not-true-then-false.com/2009/howto-install-nvidia-driver-on-fedora-and-just-disable-the-nouveau-driver/

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